Summary

Current Position: US Representative of NY 21st District since 2021
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position:  Businessman
District: Includes Syracuse, Utica, and Rome.

Williams joined the United States Navy in 1991, where he served as an officer on the submarine the USS Georgia.

Brandon is also a pioneer in innovation, founding a software company that now helps large industrial manufacturers modernize their production plants, secure their critical infrastructure from cyber-attacks, and paves the way for reduced emissions through advances in artificial intelligence.

OnAir Post: Brandon Williams NY-22

News

i
Media

About

Source: Government page

Brandon Williams  NY-22 1Brandon was born in Dallas, Texas and attended Pepperdine University in California where he received a BA in Liberal Arts. In August of 1990, during the build up to the first Gulf War, Brandon volunteered to serve as a nuclear submarine officer for the Navy.  He graduated from college in December 1990 and reported to Officer Candidate School in March 1991. Transitioning into the nuclear engineering training was a very steep learning curve, one which he successfully accomplished against significant odds. During his military service, he made six strategic-deterrent patrols in the Pacific aboard the USS Georgia, serving as the Strategic Missile Officer. Early in his military service he fell in love and married Stephanie McRee (Williams), daughter of a senior Army officer and Vietnam Veteran (Col. McRee was awarded three Bronze Stars with Valor). Stephanie grew up on Army bases and experienced first-hand the threat of Communism while her father was stationed in Germany on the front lines of the Cold War. Following his Navy service, Brandon attended the renowned Wharton School in Philadelphia, earning an MBA double majoring in in Operations & Information Management and Finance.

Brandon’s military career and entrepreneurial career have taken him and his family around this country, but they landed in Central New York in 2010. Together, Brandon and Stephanie started an agribusiness in the Finger Lakes region and participated in attracting tourist and economic development to our community.

Brandon is also a pioneer in innovation, founding a software company that now helps large industrial manufacturers modernize their production plants, secure their critical infrastructure from cyber-attacks, and paves the way for reduced emissions through advances in artificial intelligence.

Today, Brandon humbly represents the people of New York’s 22nd District in Congress. Brandon is an entrepreneur, a husband of thirty years, the father of two adult children, and a Veteran of the U.S. Navy.

Personal

Full Name: Brandon M. Williams

Gender: Male

Family: Wife: Stephanie; 2 Children

Birth Place: Dallas, TX

Home City: Syracuse, NY

Religion: Christian

Source:

Education

Attended, Artificial Intelligence, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Sloan School of Management

BA, Chinese Studies, Pepperdine University

MBA, Operations and Information Management/Finance, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, 1996-1998

Political Experience

Representative, United States House of Representatives, New York, District 22, 2023-present

Candidate, United States House of Representatives, New York, District 22, 2022

Offices

Washington, D.C. Office
1022 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515
Phone: (202) 225-3701
Syracuse District Office
The Galleries of Syracuse
440 South Warren Street,
Suite 706,
Syracuse, NY 13202
Phone: (315) 233-4333
Utica District Office
421 Broad Street,
Suite #7,
Utica, NY 13501
Phone: (315) 732-0713

Contact

Email: Government page

Web Links

Politics

Source: none

Finances

For the 118th Congress, Congressman Williams will serve on these three House committees and each of their respective following subcommittees:

1. Transportation and Infrastructure
Subcommittees:
– Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials
– Highways and Transit
– Water Resources and Environment
2. Science, Space, and Technology
Subcommittees:
– Chairman of the Subcommittee on Energy
– Research and Technology
3. Education and the Workforce
Subcommittees:
– Early Childhood, Elementary and Secondary Education
– Higher Education and Workforce Investment

Source: Open Secrets

New Legislation

Sponsored Legislation
Co-Sponsored Legislation

Issues

Source: Government page

More Information

Services

Source: Government page

District

Source: Wikipedia

New York’s 22nd congressional district is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives currently represented by Republican Brandon Williams. Significant cities in the district include Syracuse, Utica, and Rome. It is home to several colleges and universities, including Syracuse University, Hamilton College, Colgate University, SUNY Polytechnic Institute, and Utica University. It was one of 18 districts that would have voted for Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election had they existed in their current configuration while being won or held by a Republican in 2022.

The district consists of Madison, Oneida, and Onondaga Counties, as well as a sliver of Oswego County.

Wikipedia


Brandon McDonald Williams (born May 22, 1967) is an American politician, farmer, and businessman serving as the U.S. representative for New York’s 22nd congressional district since 2023. He is a member of the Republican Party.[1]

Early life and career

Williams was born in Dallas, Texas, to James McDonald “Don” Williams and Judy Williams. He was the second of five children. Don, a corporate lawyer, would serve as chairman of the Trammell Crow Company from 1994 to 2002.[2] George Seay was a childhood friend, whom he met in fifth grade at St. Mark’s School of Texas. The two both attended Highland Park High School and played on the football team.[3]

Williams enrolled at Baylor University after graduation but transferred to Pepperdine University after a year. At Pepperdine he was elected president of student government in his second year. In the summer before his senior year he volunteered with World Vision International in Africa, where he contracted a severe case of malaria. After taking a semester off to recover, he studied Asian studies at Harvard University for a year as a visiting student.[4] In 1990, he graduated from Pepperdine with a Bachelor of Arts degree in liberal arts.[5][3]

Williams joined the United States Navy in 1991, where he served as an officer on the submarine the USS Georgia.[6] After leaving the U.S. Navy as a lieutenant in 1996, he studied at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, earning an MBA in 1998. He worked as an investment banker and business executive, and co-founded the startup funding company IgniteIP, which received $20 million in initial funding from investors. He later founded and served as CEO of the industrial process software company CPLANE. Joel Peterson, former chairman of JetBlue and a friend of Don Williams, gave Williams $2 million to invest in CPLANE.[7][3]

In 2008, Williams and his wife purchased a 67 acres (27 ha) farm in Sennett, New York.[8] The farm is focused on bees, lavender, and truffles. Despite the difficulty of growing truffles and the fact that the Williamses are the first to attempt to grow truffles so far north in New York State, they began producing truffles in 2019, and the farm has been visited by mycologists.[8][9][3][10]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2022

On January 14, 2022, incumbent U.S. Representative John Katko announced that he would not seek reelection in 2022, creating a vacancy. The contentious 2022 redistricting combined much of Katko’s district with portions of the previous district 22, then represented by Claudia Tenney, whose district was divided into several new districts. Tenney successfully ran in the new 24th district. Williams’ home in Sennett lay in the 24th, two miles outside of the border of the 22nd; he chose to run in the 22nd, in part, to avoid a primary against Tenney. There is no legal requirement that a representative live within the district he represents, although the fact that he did not became a point of criticism.[11]

Williams had begun thinking about running for office during the COVID-19 pandemic, and began his campaign after Katko announced his retirement. In the primary he campaigned as a supporter of Trump and his America First agenda, a marked change from Katko, who had voted in favor of the second impeachment of Donald Trump. Williams was critical of Katko’s bipartisanship, calling it “politics as usual” and Katko a RINO.[12] Katko, while supporting other local Republicans, remained neutral in the primary. Katko supporters endorsed Steven Wells, a local party official who had lost to Tenney in the 2016 primary, and who was seen as the party’s favorite.[3] Wells was endorsed by House Republican Conference chair Elise Stefanik,[13] while Williams was endorsed by the Conservative Party of New York.[14] Campaign ads by the Republican Congressional Leadership Fund during the primary criticized Williams for living on a truffle farm, using the expensive gourmet ingredient to portray him as an out-of-touch elitist.[8] Wells avoided debates and local media interviews, which may have contributed to his defeat.[9] Williams’ victory over Wells was described as an upset by some news sources.[15][16]

Williams faced Democratic nominee Francis Conole, also a U.S. Navy veteran, in the general election. The race gained national attention. Politico and The New York Times both noted the race as particularly competitive.[9][17] National PACs ran ads, including more ads drawing attention to truffles, from the Democratic House Majority PAC this time.[8] Republican minority whip Steve Scalise visited Syracuse to fundraise for Williams,[18] and Stefanik gave Williams her endorsement,[19] while Katko continued to not endorse Williams.[20] Debates between Williams and Conole were contentious, with both accusing the other of misrepresenting themselves and their opponent. Conole said that Williams did not know Central New York and that his self-descriptions as a “political outsider” were bogus. Williams said that Conole’s 20-year military career left him ill-equipped to handle issues of the economy and private business.[21] In the general election, Williams defeated Conole by a margin of 1.5%.[22]

2024

On August 22, 2023, Williams announced that he was running for a second term in 2024.[23] In February 2024, Speaker of the House Mike Johnson was a guest at a $1,000-ticket fundraiser for Williams held at a country club in New Hartford.[24]

Due to the 2024 redistricting, Williams’ home in Sennett is now part of the 22nd district.

Tenure

He was one of four Republican representatives from New York who on January 11, 2023 called for George Santos to resign in light of false biographical statements that Santos had made.[25] On December 1, he voted yes on the successful vote to expel Santos from the House.[26]

On September 12, 2023, when House speaker Kevin McCarthy announced an impeachment inquiry against Joe Biden, Williams said he supported the inquiry.[27]

An analysis by LegiStorm found that Williams’s office had an unusually high rate of staff turnover, ranking as the 3rd highest rate in the House.[28] At a 2023 Christmas party in Washington, a verbal confrontation between Williams and Michael Gordon, his former chief of staff and campaign manager, was recorded by another former staffer.[29] Williams said that Sweeney and Gordon had threatened to expose personal details about his daughter.[30]

Committee assignments

For the 118th Congress:[31]

Political views

In his 2022 campaign, Williams highlighted his “sharp conservative views.”[32] At a candidate forum, he named “socialist ideology” the number one threat to the United States. Williams, who homeschooled his children, is an advocate for school vouchers.[3] Williams said he would oppose any effort in Congress to restrict or remove access to firearms, including red flag laws and bans of assault weapons and high-capacity magazines. He has said he would support stronger background checks for gun purchases.[12] His campaign statements expressed support for voter identification requirements, and for building a wall on the Mexican border.[33] At an open house shortly after inauguration, he said his concerns included energy policy and government spending.[34]

Williams voted for Donald Trump in the 2016 and 2020 U.S. presidential elections. He believes the 2020 presidential election raised questions about state election laws, although he also stated that President Joe Biden was elected legitimately.[35][32] He compared the January 6th hearings to the Moscow trials,[9] and denounced Trump’s indictment by a Manhattan grand jury in March 2023.[36]

In his 2022 campaign, Williams said “each state, not the federal government, should decide what restrictions, if any, to place on abortion.”[12] He opposes abortion and believes it should be banned with exceptions in the case of rape, incest or to save the life of the mother.[37][38]

Personal life

Williams met his wife, Stephanie, at a Bible study group in Orlando, Florida, while in the U.S. Navy. They married in 1992 and have two children.[12] They began homeschooling their children after a conflict with a teacher over religion while their daughter was in the second grade.[3][12]

In addition to Florida, Texas, and upstate New York, Williams also lived in Seattle, New York City, and Silicon Valley. In 2010 the Williams family built a home on their farm in Sennett and settled there permanently in 2019.[11][3]

Williams’s father Don is politically active in Dallas, particularly in social equality and racial justice. In 1995 he founded the Foundation for Community Empowerment, which focuses on urban revitalization in South Dallas.[39] After the George Floyd protests of 2020, Don Williams and other members of the Dallas business elite developed an eight-point action plan that included raising the minimum wage, banning police use of chokeholds, and expanding Medicaid in Texas.[2] Williams has said that he disagrees with his father politically but appreciates what he has done for Dallas’s poor.[3]

References

  1. ^ “New York New Members 2023”. The Hill. November 17, 2022. Archived from the original on November 18, 2022. Retrieved November 18, 2022.
  2. ^ a b Schutze, Jim (July 2, 2020). “Don Williams Swears the Oligarchy Is Down With BLM”. D Magazine. Archived from the original on November 15, 2022. Retrieved May 28, 2023.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i Weiner, Mark (October 28, 2022). “Meet Brandon Williams: An outsider fights for Central NY seat in Congress”. syracuse. Archived from the original on November 14, 2022. Retrieved November 15, 2022.
  4. ^ Lonas, Lexi; Irwin, Lauren (December 5, 2023). “Lawmakers tear into college heads on antisemitism”. The Hill. Archived from the original on December 5, 2023. Retrieved December 6, 2023.
  5. ^ “WILLIAMS, Brandon”. US House of Representatives: History, Art & Archives. Archived from the original on August 23, 2023. Retrieved May 27, 2023.
  6. ^ “Biography”. Congressman Brandon Williams. Archived from the original on May 13, 2023. Retrieved May 29, 2023.
  7. ^ Weiner, Mark (February 23, 2022). “GOP tech entrepreneur enters race for John Katko’s seat in Congress”. syracuse. Archived from the original on October 11, 2022. Retrieved October 11, 2022.
  8. ^ a b c d Harding, Robert (October 31, 2022). “Truffle kerfuffle: Brandon Williams defends farm after attack ads in race for Congress”. Auburn Citizen. Archived from the original on November 17, 2022. Retrieved May 26, 2023.
  9. ^ a b c d French, Marie J. (October 23, 2022). “How two Navy veterans are battling for one of the nation’s biggest toss-up House seats”. POLITICO. Archived from the original on May 10, 2023. Retrieved May 28, 2023.
  10. ^ Parsnow, Luke; Arpey, Jack (August 23, 2022). “Brandon Williams wins GOP primary in CNY House seat to succeed Katko”. Spectrum Local News. Archived from the original on October 11, 2022. Retrieved October 11, 2022.
  11. ^ a b Harding, Robert (May 3, 2023). “Rep. Brandon Williams does not live in his CNY House district. Does it matter?”. Auburn Citizen. Archived from the original on August 23, 2023. Retrieved May 26, 2023.
  12. ^ a b c d e Weiner, Mark (November 2, 2022). “What issues separate Francis Conole, Brandon Williams in race for Central NY House seat”. syracuse. Archived from the original on February 1, 2023. Retrieved May 29, 2023.
  13. ^ Weiner, Mark (June 30, 2022). “Rep. Elise Stefanik makes endorsement in Syracuse’s GOP primary for Congress”. syracuse. Archived from the original on May 16, 2023. Retrieved May 28, 2023.
  14. ^ Harding, Robert (March 5, 2022). “NY Conservative Party endorses Williams, Auburn-area GOP candidate for Congress”. Auburn Citizen. Archived from the original on June 5, 2022. Retrieved May 28, 2023.
  15. ^ Donovan, Andrew (November 3, 2022). “Watch Thursday Night: Candidates for 22nd Congress debate on NewsChannel 9”. WSYR. Archived from the original on November 14, 2022. Retrieved May 28, 2023.
  16. ^ Weiner, Mark (August 24, 2022). “Brandon Williams upsets Steve Wells in GOP primary for Congress”. syracuse. Archived from the original on December 10, 2022. Retrieved May 28, 2023.
  17. ^ Ashford, Grace (October 31, 2022). “N.Y. Democrats in Tough Fight to Capture an Open G.O.P. House Seat”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 2, 2023. Retrieved May 28, 2023.
  18. ^ Weiner, Mark (October 24, 2022). “Steve Scalise, Adam Schiff headed to Syracuse to support House candidates”. syracuse. Archived from the original on March 26, 2023. Retrieved May 28, 2023.
  19. ^ Harding, Robert (September 1, 2022). “Elise Stefanik endorses Brandon Williams for Congress after supporting primary foe”. Auburn Citizen. Archived from the original on September 1, 2022. Retrieved May 28, 2023.
  20. ^ Weiner, Mark (September 30, 2022). “Rep. John Katko won’t endorse Republican nominee to succeed him in Congress”. syracuse. Archived from the original on November 17, 2022. Retrieved May 28, 2023.
  21. ^ Weiner, Mark (October 26, 2022). “House candidates Francis Conole, Brandon Williams clash in fiery syracuse.com debate”. syracuse. Archived from the original on February 8, 2023. Retrieved May 28, 2023.
  22. ^ “New York 22nd Congressional District Election Results”. The New York Times. November 8, 2022. Archived from the original on December 5, 2022. Retrieved December 5, 2022.
  23. ^ Manore, Alexis (August 22, 2023). “Brandon Williams announces campaign for second term”. Rome Sentinel. Archived from the original on August 23, 2023. Retrieved August 23, 2023.
  24. ^ Manore, Alexis (February 22, 2024). “Speaker of the House Mike Johnson supports Brandon Williams’ campaign at exclusive fundraiser”. Rome Sentinel. Retrieved February 25, 2024.
  25. ^ Gold, Michael; Ashford, Grace (January 11, 2023). “George Santos Faces Calls to Resign From 4 G.O.P. Congressmen”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on May 26, 2023. Retrieved May 26, 2023.
  26. ^ Perry, Kati; Blanco, Adrián (December 1, 2023). “How each House member voted on expelling George Santos from Congress”. Washington Post. Retrieved December 1, 2023.
  27. ^ Weiner, Mark (September 12, 2023). “Rep. Brandon Williams backs GOP decision to open Biden impeachment inquiry”. syracuse. Archived from the original on September 13, 2023. Retrieved September 13, 2023.
  28. ^ Weiner, Mark (October 12, 2023). “Rep. Brandon Williams has 3rd highest staff turnover rate in House”. syracuse. Archived from the original on October 18, 2023. Retrieved December 1, 2023.
  29. ^ Weiner, Mark (December 1, 2023). “Rep. Brandon Williams threatens ex-staffer in holiday party confrontation (see video)”. syracuse. Archived from the original on December 2, 2023. Retrieved December 1, 2023.
  30. ^ Beavers, Olivia (December 8, 2023). “GOP lawmaker: Ousted aides targeted my daughter for OnlyFans account”. Politico. Archived from the original on December 8, 2023. Retrieved December 8, 2023.
  31. ^ Committees and Caucuses
  32. ^ a b Gold, Michael (November 10, 2022). “Swing Voters Rejected Far-Right Candidates. But Not So Much in New York”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on May 10, 2023. Retrieved May 26, 2023.
  33. ^ Manore, Alexis (August 17, 2022). “22nd Congressional District candidates vie for victory in Aug. 23 primary election”. Rome Sentinel. Archived from the original on August 23, 2023. Retrieved August 23, 2023.
  34. ^ Manore, Alexis (January 19, 2023). “Rep. Brandon Williams hosts open house at Utica office”. Rome Sentinel. Archived from the original on August 23, 2023. Retrieved August 23, 2023.
  35. ^ Weiner, Mark (July 14, 2022). “CNY race for Congress: Steve Wells ducks Trump talk while opponent embraces ex-prez”. syracuse. Archived from the original on May 16, 2023. Retrieved May 26, 2023.
  36. ^ Manore, Alexis Manore (March 31, 2023). “Williams joins fellow GOP members to defend Trump, denounce indictment”. Rome Sentinel. Archived from the original on August 23, 2023. Retrieved August 23, 2023.
  37. ^ Harding, Robert (August 3, 2022). “Wells, Williams quizzed about abortion, 2020 elections and more at Syracuse forum”. Auburn Citizen. Archived from the original on May 27, 2023. Retrieved May 29, 2023.
  38. ^ Reeher, Grant (August 13, 2022). “Brandon Williams on the Campbell Conversations”. WRVO Public Media. Archived from the original on August 23, 2023. Retrieved May 29, 2023.
  39. ^ “Who we are”. The Foundation for Community Empowerment. March 1, 2019. Archived from the original on February 1, 2023. Retrieved May 28, 2023.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York’s 22nd congressional district

2023–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
426th
Succeeded by